Home > Ticket > What have hedgerows ever done for us? (And what we can do for them in return) – 9 December 2021

What have hedgerows ever done for us? (And what we can do for them in return) – 9 December 2021

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Description

Time: 4.00pm – 5.30pm

You are invited to join us for an online discussion about hedgerows; why they are so valuable to wildlife, to the environment and to our farming, and what we can be doing to ensure they thrive in the future.

Hedges are a man-made man-managed habitat and it’s thanks to centuries of farming that we have the wonderful network of hedges that we see today. The reason we still have so many ancient hedges is thanks to an unbroken chain of care, management, and periodic rejuvenation. But they’ll only survive with similar care and consideration going forward.

This afternoon-of-hedge will start with a talk from our Key Habitats Officer Megan Gimber, covering the multiple values of our hedgerows, a bit about their history, condition and their lifecycle, before looking a bit deeper into the various ways we can manage hedgerows so we can get the most from them in the long term.

Our Dormouse officer Ian White will add some context from the point of view of Dormice, a species dependent on hedgerows, and which has seen some worrying declines.

Finally, we will introduce the Healthy Hedgerows app, which is a free tool available to help make decisions about hedge management at the farm scale.

This session is aimed at farmers and cluster group facilitators. If you are a cluster group facilitator, please send this invitation around to any members of your group that you think might be interested.

The discussion will take place on zoom and a link will be sent to you upon registration.

We are in a biodiversity and a climate change crisis. With a few changes to the way we manage them, hedgerows can offer a real opportunity on both fronts. 

 

 

This project is funded by the government’s Green Recovery Challenge Fund. The fund is being delivered by The National Lottery Heritage Fund in partnership with Natural England and the Environment Agency.